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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Curious to see if anybody else is out there trying to shoot some wolves and if they have had any succsess??? They certainly are becoming a problem in eastern areas of the province, although i'm sure the west has their fair share too... I tried all last winter to get one but only manged to see them when gunless!!! :evil:

In order to rebalance what we have unbalanced in terms of big game populations we need to start taking some, not all, of these predators out... Hopefully its not too late already to save the moose in 26 and surrounding areas like the whiteshell... Once again the province was a little late in deciding to try to protect big game...

Now please don't get me wrong, i'm not blaming the decline of the big game solely on the wolf, there are some other factors involved as well, Such as habitat loss and poaching... But nobody seems to be shooting wolves, even with the generous bounty on them now... I understand that it doesn't sound appealing to freeze your a$$ off for days on end to try and shoot one or even just catch a glimpse of one, but yet when late moose rolls around pack up the truck and go sit in the bush and freeze for days to try an kill a moose before they are all gone...

I will add i've never hunted a moose, and that with the way things are going I doubt I will anytime soon...
 

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I 've tried baiting a couple of times in 26 as well as having had a couple of shots over the years while deer hunting. IIRC I saw 8 wolves this past year while deer and grouse hunting up there. It's perhaps more involved than baiting for bears and for 2012 the baiting regs are the same as for bears, so there are a few more regs for that now too. The new regs book states that in areas like 26 and 36 there is a two wolf limit on a big game tag. Nothing has changed there and it also has not changed for non-residents of Canada either. I truly DON'T think that getting wolf numbers in control is a priority at all based on what I see there. And it escapes me why not. It is not the only factor in declining moose populations but I think it has been underestimated at a crucial point in that decline. Bears are a factor too but we won't go there as I believe that is being managed better. By the way, there is no bounty. There is an "extra incentive" for Registered Trapline trappers only of $250/wolf and that is only in those areas where the moose recovery program is in place.
The 2nd big factor is the increase in the deer population in those areas and the diseases and parasites transmitted to moose by them. Again, I don't think reducing deer numbers is a priority based on what I see in the new regs either. Last year in 26 a person could have taken 5 deer there with very extended seasons. This year that has been reduced by 2. I guess the wolves are being depended on to do the rest. Oh, wait, they eat moose calves too. Hmmm. :? Maybe there is an anticipation of a huge influx of additional hunters there because there is a second and third tag (antlerless) there and nowhere else. Bring your kevlar. :roll:
We are led to believe that progress is being made on the 3rd major impact which is unlicensed hunting (not poaching by definition). I haven't heard too much on that front, hopefully progress is being made. Relative to that effort is one that aims to limit access; via trails mainly. That limits the unlicensed hunters who don't want to work at getting a moose but it does the same for deer hunters in the area. This is counterproductive to reducing the deer population.
I don't want to be negative here but it's difficult. I don't think there is much hope for bringing back moose in 36. When was the last time anyone has seen one in the inhabited area of the park? I can't recall ever seeing one since the 70's and I spent a lot of time there, including some areas off the beaten path. Area 26 has a chance in the northern areas but in South Nopiming I give it a 40% chance at best, but only because it has a chance of getting some nomads from Ontario.
I doubt that I will get another chance to hunt moose there again. It was always a late season for the licensed hunters and it used to be brutal weather most of the time, 20-30 below quite often, using sleds on designated routes to access hunting areas. If you have ever seen Vince Creighton's presentation on moose, especially recently, part of it shows the impact on a population recovery with calf mortality as the wild card. With no adults taken by hunting at all and "normal" calf and adult mortality it takes a long time for the population to stablilize. The factors that impact that mortality have not been fully addressed.
Sorry for the off - topic, looks like a rant, response here.
I see your location is Bissett. What's your take on the moose and wolf populations there in the North end of 26?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Its not looking good for the moose, Luckily we now have the "Moose hunting prohibited" in 26... This goes for licensed and unlicensed hunters alike, with the same concequences for everyone... Thankfully all the reserves up here finally jumped on the band wagon and agreed to this as did the manitoba metis federation... At least now the moose have a "safe" zone from humans... See the odd one here and there but not like they used to be apparently ( I should add i've only been here for six years)...

As far as wolves go, there are lots... Last I heard caribou pack (between bissett and quesnel)was around 20 dogs, How many moose do they eat a week??? some of the other surrounding packs are said to be in excess of 15... I've personally seen packs of eight and seen tracks where 25 crossed a lake where we were ice fishing...

I don't think deer are to blame at all, it was a way of covering up what was really happening... Look at the SW corner of the province, the deer and moose coincide just fine, never heard of brainworm there... Up here you would be hard pressed to see three deer let alone shoot three... i beleive the only consitant way to kill deer up here is by baiting, which will likely never happen and I think thats a good thing... I don't think there are enough numbers of deer or moose up hereto have very much contact with each other... Granted the southern half of 26 has some higher deer numbers...

I think that the bears are being managed properly... there is no doubt that bears are responsable for more moose calf mortality than the wolves are, but the bear population hasn't been increasing like the wolves have...

Sad as it is to say eventually the wolves wont be a problem either, Nature will take its course, the moose will be gone the deer will be gone, and the wolves will move on to greener pastures, or starve to death or maybe us humans up here wandering around will become targets of opportunity...

As for the bounty i believe it was $125 a wolf in 26 put on by manitoba conservation... There were posters up here stating this... They said nothing about being a registered trapper on them... they wanted a molar tooth i believe...
 

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The reason the brainworm thing is worse in the east is because there is a snail that is the go-between that exists in the boreal type forest. It doesn't exist in the southwest so the brainworm doesn't either. I think there is a note in the new regs regarding the extra incentive for RTL trappers only, I will look and post.
 

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Here are the moose programs:



These actions include:

• Moose hunting: All licensed moose hunting seasons have been suspended. Moose seasons in the Duck Mountain, GHA 26, GHA 14, 14A, and GHA 13, 13A will be reinstated when populations have recovered.
• Wolf management: Wolf hunting and trapping seasons have been extended province-wide. The bag limit in the Duck Mountain and GHA 26 is two wolves. This will result in the harvest of more wolves in areas where moose populations are depressed. Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship will undertake regular aerial surveys of wolf populations and assess diet of wolves.
• Disease and parasite management: Parasites (brain worm, liver fluke) carried by deer in the southeast part of the province have negatively affected moose. Deer muzzleloader and general seasons in GHAs 26 and 36 have been extended to reduce deer numbers. As well, a second deer licence will continue to be available in GHAs 17A, 26 and 36. A third deer licence is available in GHA 26.
• Access control: Selected roads and trails are being closed by removing culverts, digging trenches and berms and placing barricades at river crossings. This is being done in high moose-density areas to restrict truck travel, reduce ORV traffic and decrease harvest of moose.
• Moose population assessment: $190,000 is being used from the Wildlife Enhancement Initiative for aerial moose surveys. Populations of concern will be monitored regularly to evaluate the effectiveness of management actions.
• Consultation with rights-based communities: First Nations and Métis communities are being consulted about initiatives to increase moose populations in areas where they are depressed. These consultation efforts have resulted in moose conservation hunting closures for all people in the Duck Mountain, Porcupine Mountain and GHAs 14 and 14A. A partial area closure for all people has been implemented in GHA 26.
• Moose management strategies: Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship will establish moose advisory committees consisting of local groups, Aboriginal organizations and government to help develop moose recovery strategies. These strategies will guide the management actions.
• Increased enforcement efforts: Two natural resource officers have been hired for the Duck Mountain area and one for GHA 26.
• Wildlife biologists: Two wildlife biologists, located in Swan River and Lac Du Bonnet, have been hired to implement moose recovery programs.



I will continue looking for the incentive thing.
 

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Here it is. I did a search in the new regs to find the bulletin that was put out last year. And the closure for 26 that was agreed on by first nations was a partial closure.

"In addition to the closure, Manitoba Conservation is moving forward immediately on a wolf management program as wolves are a significant predator of moose in these areas.

The wolf management program includes:

•providing an incentive of $250 to trappers on trap-lines in these areas for harvesting a wolf and providing tissue samples for dietary analysis. The trapper incentive program will be in effect from Oct. 15 to March 31 and up to $80,000 in funding is available;
•continuing the increased bag limit for licensed hunters in these areas to two wolves from one;
•holding more wolf trapping technique workshops; this fall in Duck Mountain, eastern Manitoba and The Pas; and
•determining wolf populations and pack sizes through aerial surveys."
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm going to take a look around town up here and see if i can find a poster... They specifically wanted a tooth for it... Regardless 90% of the trappers are not actively pursuing wolves, I hear of a few being caught but most guys i know up here are mainly after martens and fishers...

Last fall I believe it was MB conservation had a fellow come up to the school at Wanipigow and teach a trapping course on wolves for the younger generation... I think he was from alberta and was a "Professional Goverment Trapper"... It was a positive step forward, It got some kids outside and got them trying their luck at getting some wolves...
 

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Wish they taught trapping when I was in school, I remember doing a presentation on hunting and some EA (educative assistant) Almost burst into tears because I had a picture of me holding a buncha dead geese lol. Lots of Wolves in the SE where I hunt, crafty buggers. When I was younger I could have taken a few but I had no desire at the time, of course now, There are more wolves than ever, I'm willing to shoot them but I just dont see them :lol: Depending what happens this next deer season (If I tag out early) I may put some effort into taking one. I sat on my gutpile from my deer least year all day only to see a few ravens and a very angry bald eagle.
 

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Without a second deer tag for that area, 35 I believe you cannot hunt for a wolf after you tag a deer early. You have to wait for all the big game seasons to end (bear , deer , moose, etc.) before you can start hunting for wolves again with your used deer tag/license. At that point you're good to go until the end of March. The baiting regs have changed too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes to hunt wolves when any big game season is on you need to have an unused tag for whichever species the season is open for...
 

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What about if I am party hunting? I imagine as long as there is a free deer tag I can still target wolves correct?
 

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I would think that if you are legally party hunting for deer that it would also give you the right to hunt wolves too, as it does the holder of the unused tag/license. I would confirm that though.
 

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Whoever wrote stories like "The boy who cried wolf" and "Little red riding hood" its because the author saw one of these brutes carry off a sheep or something lol.
 

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offshoreonly said:
This is a pic of a wolf shot in southeatern sask. Someone emailed this to me the other day
That thing looks like it's on steroids!
 
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