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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i would like to start loading my own rifle cartridges 30-06 to start with what do i need and does anyone have any tips?

what bullet? (for White Tails )
what primers?
what brass ?
what powders?
what else do i need that i don't even know exists?

i have never tried it before and have no idea any pointers would be much appreciated
 

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I would recommend searching Youtube for videos and beginner guides. It's better to get a visual of what the tools look like. There's a lot involved, and starting up can be pricey. And remember you're getting married, better check with the wife! :p :lol:

I have reloading equipment for a few calibers, but hardly reload anymore. I just don't have much time for it, plus the amount I shoot I might as well just buy factory. But I'm hanging onto it all and saving my brass so one day when I'm reloading more often I'll have plenty.

Cartridge components-
Bullet really depends on how much you want to spend.
Primer brand I don't think matters too much, I use Federal (215 I think) There's small rifle and large rifle.
Powder just depends on the bullet weight, and I'd start by talking to people and looking online to see what powders are giving people the best accuracy with the particular bullet you've chosen.
Brass you could buy a bag or reload the brass from factory rounds you've used, but either way I would try to keep all the same brand together. Winchester brass is good and I've heard it's thicker walled and longer lasting vs. Remington. I've also known Federal to be a good choice.

An electronic scale would be best, as well as an electronic caliper to measure cases and OAL, etc. A de-burring tool, powder trickler, Then the press, dies, and a thick sturdy bench to mount the press on. A reloading manual...

If you decide on a bullet type at a price you're willing to spend, you can start you're own load going by the book, but what I'd reccomend is finding a very detailed report where someone has got that very bullet shooting very accurately out of the same gun, and they can tell you the Brass, primers, powder type and weight, case OAL, cartridge OAL, crimp, etc... that they used. To be safe I would still compare their powder load to what an official reloading manual says. There's really no need to push the max reloading rifle rounds, and there are a number of factors affecting chamber pressures. So be safe.
 

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The very first step in getting into reloading is to buy or get electronic copies of at least two reloading books like the ABC's of reloading and read them from front to back. A week later read them again. Then peruse the catalogues and forums to see the battle over brands of equipment. There are a lot of decent instruction videos on the web too; just don't use them as a shortcut for the books. And if you can find a mentor to guide you along your way that's a real bonus.
Of course before that you need to assess why you either want or need to reload. If you are going to reload for just one caliber for hunting and are very likely to shoot less than a box a year you might just want to find a factory loading that shoots well in your rifle and leave it at that. If you are going to shoot a lot at a range with multiple rifles including some used for hunting then reloading will save you a pile and you will have a lot of fun trying to find that great load for each rifle.
Reloading will take up some time if you get serious about it. And even more time shooting all that ammo you've created. There are many "rules" that one needs to follow and also many good habits that need to be developed to ensure your safety (but that's another thread).
As for equipment, that will depend a lot on if you will be reloading for both rifle and pistol and the quantities involved. Single stage or progressive? Turret or single?
As for components, brass, primers and bullets are not too critical. Just be consistent with them. 150 grain Hornady SST's are more than adequate and there are other similar types out there. Powder is best determined by looking at the reloading manuals to see which powders develop the best velocities (hopefully with lower pressures) with any given bullet style and weight. You need to stay with the more popular choices so that you can in fact find them. A couple of years ago it was brutal finding any powder and primers were hard to come by too. Always start with minimum loads and work towards max in small increments. The goal in reloading is to develop accurate loads not the fastest possible. The target at 100 yards or the deer will not know the difference if they are shot with a round that is 100 FPS faster or not. There is way more to ballistics than muzzle velocity.
 

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PM me and I could help. I have dies for the .30-06 that I don't need anymore. I could lend them to you and show you how on my equipment. It takes time and dedication..... not all of your answers can be answered on a forum. Every rifle is different and the fun thing about reloading is finding the load that works best. Once you do it worth its weight in gold!

Just Pm me and we can talk
 
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