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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What has become of the arts of stalking, and still hunting? As I was watching the various hunting shows on tv this morning, I suddenly became aware that there are basically only two types of hunting done any more when it comes to deer, bear and antelope hunting, (just a slight exageration for literary purposes). Every show was entirely about sitting in a tree stand or ground blind waiting for a deer or bear to come in, or else doing looong range shooting at pronghorn out to 870 yards! Are stalking and still hunting done anymore, or have they gone the way of the Dodo?
 

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I grew up still hunting with my dad. I love to try and stalk an animal too. It all depends on the areas that one hunts i suppose, but the vast majority of hunting that is done these days and on hunting shows is stand/blind hunting. If you hunt an area that has lots of other hunters in it, like public grounds, then i would stand hunt. Use the other hunters to your advantage, when they move around they might bump deer towards you. But if on private property, like my own, i love to still hunt/stand hunt. I'll still hunt into an area where i have a stand or blind and sit there for awhile, then still hunt my way to another stand sight.
I think it is good be be versitle as a hunter and be able to stalk, still hunt and stand hunt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I can't argue that point, but, do you think the sense of accomplishment is hightened when one takes a game animal as a result of active hunting, versus passive? Don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking stand and blind hunting. They certainly are extremely effective, but imo, it's a lot different waiting for a deer to come to you, instead of you pursueing the deer.
 

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I LOVE STALKING !! But for a big deer i think having a plan and setting the perfect ambush gives you more chance of success
 

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For starter's the reason you see so many tv shows from a treestand or blind is that it is much easier to film and be successful doing so. Its hard enough to stalk up on game yourself, let alone a camera man who is lugging around a bunch of equipment.

I love to still hunt for deer and have shot the majority of my big game animals with 2 feet on the ground, but must say that sitting in a stand affords one a better chance at the big boys. Back when I started hunting, a treestand was a few 2x4's nailed to a tree for steps and a little wooden platform nailed across a couple of big branches. Not the most comfortable of set ups.
Now with the advent of light weight hang on, climbing and ladder stands it is much easier and more comfortable to sit for hours at a time in a tree.

I started sitting more in a tree when my son turned 12. We purchased a doubleman treestand and it was a great way for him to be succesful.Many a deer has fallen while he has sat in a tree. Funny thing though, his first ever deer was shot from the ground while we were slowly walking to our evening blind. Never made it to the blind that evening.

In regards to private vs public land, I am in the opposite opinion of Fish_Killer. I like public land for still hunting as it affords me lots of space to stalk or track and for the most part I don't have to worry about my boundries. It also helps me find those little sanctuaries that most don't find sitting in a tree. Now on private land, there are usually fences and boundries that one can't cross, so instead of chasing game to a place where I can no longer hunt them, I will sit in wait more and try not to chase the deer to someone else.

Without a doubt taking an animal from the ground is more rewarding and I do enjoy it far more. The view is always changing and you don't have to dress like the Pilsbury Dough Boy while still hunting. More patience is required while stalking and slow is the word, but once you get into the zone, it is a great way to spend a day in the woods. I've walked up to bedded deer that had no clue I was there. It sure is way more fun than sitting on the edge of an alfalfa field waiting for the local herd to show up.
 

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The big things for me when walking are:

1) Having a strong wind blowing into you, covering your noise.
2) prep your gear/clothing so when you move it doesn't make noise. (Fleece)
3) Don't look for a deer per say, Depending on if your hunting thick bush look for movement, tails, antlers, hooves.
4) Stop often look and listen- moving 10 yards can change your periferals (Don't know if I'm spelling that right).
5) mono-pod! the buck I posted a picture of in the "Good-bye hunting spot" thread was taking with a mono-pod rest (one-hand adjustable) at 60 yrds, I heard him before I could see him and when he lifted his head from making a scrape I had to shoot through two poplars with about a 6-10inch gap between them, only clear shot I could take was at the white patch under the chin (Slightly quartered too me). it was either that or the head. Too much brush lower.

I'm no expert It's just when I started hunting when I was younger I would get bored easy, I didn't like sitting with other people (Youth hunting suppose to be within x-amount of distance of mentor) so I'd just grab a radio and go for a walk. My dad's friend frequently shoots deer like this, It really takes a good eye, When he drops us off into our "Spots" where we are going to spend the morning he is always seeing deer way the hell back in the bush when we are driving. (And no we are not road hunters :lol: )


I was thinking about doing this for fall bear, Found a spot where I frequently see bears going in and out of a bean field, One day when grouse hunting I saw one in the corner of the field eating so I ditched the truck and crept in the ditch and got within 50 yards just to sate my curiousity the figured that was close enough I think it would be an interesting concept....actually saw a show (I think Canada in the Rough?) where they were hunting bears like this in B.C or some such.
 

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It seems to me spot and stalk methods are used more in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Read big buck magazine or watch a few shows from there and alot of it is was driving down a road saw this big deer and went after him. Cody Robbins world record non typical muley was a spot and stalk. But he saw this deer mid summer before season and watched this beast for months learning his every movements. So I'm sure that buck for him was the most rewarding animal he's shot not because of the wr but for harvesting it after spending so much time with it. If you haven't read the story of that buck its a good read! And if you've ever met or read about Cody it couldn't have happened to a more sincere or worthy person.
 

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love still hunting and stalking, don't have much patience in sitting.....I do have a few tree stands and a ground blind for the odd occasion I'm tired and just want to sit, my son Coli hunts with me now and he has less patience than me when it comes to hunting, he'd rather walk in the bush all day and we are successful that way
 

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Obviously the terrain dictates the hunting style. Bush areas you can do both given enough space. It may only be going to or from a stand or after a few hours sitting in one. When the weather dictates you move or freeze you can always chalk the still hunting up to scouting too, right? The worst part of that scenario is getting back to your stand and finding those fresh tracks mere feet away :shock: :roll: . Just do what feels right at the time and complain or celebrate later.
 

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Stalking and still hunting is all I’ve ever done. I would fall asleep sitting for hours in one location, and I’m too old to climb trees.

Good luck guys
 
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