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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was going to start this earlier... When I bought my latest addition, there was no paperwork involved, a quick glance at my PAL and it was off to the cashier!!! I knew it was on its way out but thought it was going to take a couple years to phase out... Does anybody know if all my old guns that were registered to me still are??? Do I still need to go through the painful wait on the phone to transfer them if I sell them??? Either way its good new for gun owners!!!
 

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It's dead, just make sure you check a buyers PAL then take the money and run.
In fact I think it's cssa that is encouraging a "great Canadian gun swap" trade guns so the old information is no good
 

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Yup it's a gonner. Just to clarify to everyone reading, restricted and prohibited firearms are still registered. :shotgun:
 

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What I would like to hear is when and how the data was disposed of if it hasn't been already. I heard that Quebec wanted to start it's own registry for Quebec residents with info from the registry. I haven't heard anymore on that. Likely political posturing and I'm sure the transfer of data from the feds to that province would be challenged in court.
 

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Just curious here, but why do we care if the guns are still registered to us?


Sure the gun registry was stupid, but the only reason I thought so was because it wasted so much bloody money and you had to pay a tax (esentially) to register it. What's bad though about having the gun actually registered though? Am I just ingorant on this?
 

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whats to stop me from selling a gun to a guy who doesn't have a PAL the police would never know. Makes no sense to me not to register guns if you need a PAL to own one. I'm all for getting rid of most of the stupid laws the come with gun ownership but you should get rid of both or none at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
sled-in said:
Registration makes confiscation a lot easier for one

Yeah it did!!! Last thing we want to see is what happened in England and Australia where thousands of legally owned and registered firearms where destroyed!!!
 

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There is a BIG difference between registering guns and being given the clearance (AKA your PAL) to buy one. Hopefully only sane, law-abiding people get to buy guns legally. Saying they should be registered just because you need a PAL to buy one is another thing. My point earlier was to question if all the data in the registry has been destroyed. If it hasn't it is subject to abuse, theft and perhaps resurrection by another party forming the next government. There were security breaches of the data while the registry was in effect but that was hushed up very well. The information in there will be mostly useless in 5 years but that's a long way off.
By the way, if you sell a firearm to someone and you didn't check for that person's PAL (and they didn't have one) you just committed a crime. And if that person commits a crime using that gun? Now if that gun was registered to you under the now defunct registry but the data is still there......get my drift? I guess I'm just too paranoid in my old age and also a little too prone to CYA. They quit registering guns but to my knowledge nothing has been said about what the present data in there can still be used for, etc.
I see nothing wrong with the PAL concept. I do see a lot wrong with a registry other than the money it cost. And neither of those things will ever prevent a criminal from getting a gun if they want one, it just makes it harder. It is also supposed to make their sentence longer if they don't have a PAL and get caught with a gun.
 

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X2
The problem with the PAL snomad is that you have to renew every five years, what if a government decides that they won't renew licenses anymore? Drop off your gun at the local police station or become a criminal.

Our gun laws only stop the law abiding
 

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Our gun laws only stop the law abiding
that's my point
eg i buy a gun for 200 bucks. No one knows that gun is in my possession even if i just bought it from cabelas . I leave the store and sell it to a convicted drug dealer who can't have a PAL for 500. I just walked away from the deal with 300 bucks and no evidence i ever owned or sold the gun. It will happen !
 

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sled-in said:
X2
what if a government decides that they won't renew licenses anymore?
This doesn't make sense, are you talking for an individual only that they won't renew it, or for everybody ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
They could decide to say "no more renewals" for everybody, this is the gooberment we are talking about... It all depends on who is in power and how messed up their view of gun control is... I agree with the mass trade/sell idea as it gets the guns out of the gooberments realm of knowledge, making them much harder to try and confiscate them...
 

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No one hit on the Ammunition concept with criminals here, that it reacquires you having a PAL to purchases Ammunition.
 

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I think the odds are that if you need to be a sane law-abiding individual to get a PAL to buy a gun that you will not sell it to a known criminal that doesn't have a PAL. (I would hope someone in that frame of mind might be worried about that "criminal" being an undercover officer.) That is still a better scenario than no PAL's at all and that convicted criminal walks into a store and buys a gun and ammo.
As for non-renewal of PAL's; if there weren't any PAL's now and a government decided to confiscate all guns the reaction from gunowners would be exactly the same. (You have to believe that non-renewal of PALs would be a precursor to confiscation.) It simply wouldn't happen because they truly don't know where all the guns are. That's why the registry made gun owners so paranoid. Confiscation followed registration in many countries. (And usually something much worse followed soon after!) If you think the gun registry was a waste of money just start crunching the number it would take for complete confiscation without one.
 
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