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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just listened MeatEater podcast EP.70 with CWD expert Bryan Richards, and it was a horrifying wake up call to say the least.

just to quickly highlight some facts;

-Chronic wasting is a form of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (contagious brain disease) which is ALWAYS FATAL to cervids - deer, elk, moose, caribou. It can be transmitted through bodily fluids and feces, from one animal to another.

-The protein which causes CWD is bio available to other potential carriers of the disease for an exceptionally long time possibly nearly a decade. And is not destroyed with heat up to nearly 600*c.

-There currently is no CWD in manitoba, but there is in SK and AB. Once CWD has reached an area, it is there to stay! There is no method to treat or vaccinate against CWD. In the hot bed of CWD in the US the rate of infected deer is nearly 50%.

-a carcass from a CWD positive animal may stay infectious for YEARS. this means that if you harvest an animal in sk, transport it home, butcher it your self then improperly dispose of the bones, spinal column, skull and brain ect it can infect your local cervid population. Or maybe you don't hunt, and found a beautiful dead head on a hike and brought it home for your flower bed ect. these are just a couple of many ways it can unintentionally be introduced to Manitoba.

Manitoba has some laws to help prevent CWD but offers little insight or education behind the intent of the laws. Example : attract scents containing urine or scent glands are illegal in mb. Its not to ensure fair chase, rather that urine is collected in captive facilities, where CWD is more likely to be present and rampantly transmitted. When you apply the scent to a scrape ect, it has the potential to be passed to a susceptible animal.

It is recommended that you DO NOT consume the meat of a CWD infected animal. Once the population of our beloved deer, elk, moose caribou ect becomes infected there is just no longer a reason to partake in harvesting these animals that we enjoy stocking the freezer with.

I feel that Manitoba Sustainable Development should be putting more emphases on educating the public, whom as a whole are blissfully unaware the unintentional causes of transmission of CWD, also of the threat it posses, to our phenomenal natural resources here in Mb.

Also, I feel as outdoors men and women we all have an obligation to become educated and adhere the best practices possible to prevent our natural food source and recreational activities from going to the spoils. Also ensuring healthy populations of animals for our future generations to harvest.

You can read more here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_wasting_disease

also listen to the archived podcast AND scroll down to watch the videos on
http://www.themeateater.com/podcasts/ep-070-chronic-wasting-disease/
or find it on itunes.
 

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How is this handled in the States? Tons of people hunt south of us and consume the animals. If the CWD in deer populations is up to 50% or so in some regions and you cannot consume this meat, how do they regulate it? Or what methods are used by hunters to avoid this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
im just going to piggy back this thread to the recently posted "article on cwd" by hunt1687.
 

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I wouldn't be that concerned about it here. Manitoba banned penned hunts a long time ago, but there are still some elk farms, this could be a problem if they come into contact with wild populations.
 
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