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6.5 creed

I just can't seem to wonder why there is so many used 6.5s for sale. (ref. canadian gun nutz, EE). A good round but maybe not the best thing since sliced bread. My own opinion is that it might be too specialized for an all around hunting round, but then my playing days are over and have come to the conclusion that the perfect hunting round might not be there. Some rounds are just better than others.
 

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I just can't seem to wonder why there is so many used 6.5s for sale. (ref. canadian gun nutz, EE). A good round but maybe not the best thing since sliced bread. My own opinion is that it might be too specialized for an all around hunting round, but then my playing days are over and have come to the conclusion that the perfect hunting round might not be there. Some rounds are just better than others.
My guess there's so many for sale is because it was the supposed next big thing that everyone bought into. Inside 300 yards almost every modern cartridge has the ability to take the game you want in Manitoba let alone Canada, shy of the big bears.

There's nothing wrong with the cartridge, just like 100s of other cartridges there's nothing wrong with.

Honestly 90 plus % of rifles can out shoot the person behind it, maybe even higher than that, the average person isn't knowledgeable, capable or shoot enough to make use of the long range capabilities of most rifles let alone this cartridge, besides taking chances on game just because your rifle can reach out and touch doesn't mean that you are capable of doing so yourself.

This is coming from a guy that doesn't have a problem taking a shot at 600 yards, but that's due to practice and optimal conditions, I'd rather be closer but if no other choice then I choose to be prepared.

Nothing wrong with the cartridge, just don't get caught up in the marketing bs, choose what suits your style, not someone else's.
 

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Yup, pure marketing.
Great cartridge, like many others. The newer rounds have a much more efficient design, that's about it. Shoots a 140 gr bullet near the same speed as another round that's been out for over 100years, just does it using less powder and a smaller case.
I think the other thing the marketing has done is show how good long skinny bullets can fly true and penetrate. I put a 129 gr accubond thru a moose a few years back, penetrated thru shoulder/heart and stuck in hide on the far side- DRT. This year am shooting a 156gr 6.5 bullet on moose, not worried one bit about being undergunned.

lol now having said that, the most inefficient rounds I have, drop big critters like 'the hammer of Thor' - 12g slug and a 45-70. Every bear I have shot with those has been a rather dramatic bang-flop.

Regardless, just get out and have fun shooting your fav rifle!
 

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From my experience, if you’re hunting animals of different size in different terrain you will eventually optimize success by having more than one rifle. These days they can be purchased economically used, or with a new entry-level variety.

If you hunt bear, you’d do best with a low power scope or iron sighted 308. If you’re hunting deer on open farmland, you may enjoy the low recoil of the 6.5 and a scope that can reach between 9x-10x magnification. I started with one rifle intending to use it for everything but found myself better suited to having more than one. I suspect you will too.

It doesn’t matter which cartridges I shoot because there are many that would do the same job. But if you’re only hunting shorter bush range get the 308 in case you hunt bear. If you’re only hunting longer farmland ranges get the 6.5 Creedmoor if you can afford the Ammo and are prepared to handload if it becomes a passing fad.

I don’t want to get off topic, but I see the wisdom in the comments made regarding the 7mm-08 using 140 accubonds. That’s a cartridge I do not own or shoot, but it has a legacy and earned reputation. Don’t get an ultralight rifle or with the recoil it may as well be a 308. Otherwise if you stick to the best selling ones you can’t go wrong. A 308, 270, or 30-06. A 243 for deer, but probably not ideal for bear.

I would focus mainly on the distance and environment of the hunt, your recoil tolerance, ability to acquire ammo, and budget.

The South Carolina DNR site has some interesting study info demonstrating that deer hunting doesn’t differ substantively while using different cartridges. I don’t know if we’re allowed to post links, but they have some excellent info on several things. But a deer isn’t a bear, moose, or elk and all studies have their limitations.
 

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My $.02. . . The CreepMoore is modern millennial hype. So what can it REALLY do better than anything between the 6mm to the 30 cal?





Honestly




Oh ya, high BC bullets and minimal recoil. No one has an honest business shooting at un-wounded game past 400 yards. Every year I hear of bucks that got away and minimal time spent tracking. What was the cause????
The answer, “Well it was big and I have no idea how far. Looked like 500 or maybe 700 yards. I aimed high and heard a thump.”

How many out there actually know the immense difference between a 2 MPH across wind and a 4 MPH at say 600 yards?

No rangefinder.
No practise in off season.
Just plain irresponsibility.

Sometime I ask, (I know the answer beforehand) did you range it first? Ya so when I hear of guys with VERY LIMITED experience talk about longs range hunting I say a prayer. . .

Buy a modest cal and keep it under 200-250 the first few years. During the summer, practise. And some more. Your maximum range ought to be a consistent hit on a dinner plate in any condition. Period.

Just my feelings.
 

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A .308 might feel like a big thump, but if your spending time just shooting at the range your probably taking too many shots close together.
One or two shots at a game animal you won’t notice recoil.


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The only thing I can contribute to the selection process is pick the firearm that can match your shooting abilities. Most "hunters" want to be able to shoot a large animal at long range and few ever get to do it successfully. From what I have observed is they are not experienced enough ( either shooting or with that particular firearm ) to be successful. Purchasing an expensive firearm will not put meat on the table. In Manitoba, a 30-06 will take anything including Moose.

Good luck with what ever you choose, but know your abilities and don't expect the firearm to do all the work - it's only as good as the person who has the finger on the trigger and the keen eye !!
 

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buy a 338 win mag learn to get used to the recoil, and never wound or chase after the game you have picked to shoot in the field. Even a poorly placed shot on a deer or caribou they still drop at the hands of a 338 win mag
 

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buy a 338 win mag learn to get used to the recoil, and never wound or chase after the game you have picked to shoot in the field. Even a poorly placed shot on a deer or caribou they still drop at the hands of a 338 win mag
Terrible advice


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and why is that ?
I recommend people learn to shoot well and make the shot than just hit whatever and kill. Hunting is many things and I suppose we can disagree on hunting ethics. But shooting a gun big enough to drop whatever when hit wherever is pretty brutal. I’m primarily a bow hunter, I spend countless hours hoping for a shot and when I see an animal within range and then the sob won’t give me a clean shot.... man that’s tough, but it furthers the resolve to get back out there and trick the ol bastard again and this time maybe you get the opportunity to sling an arrow. That’s hunting man. You know what, I rarely get a good animal with the bow, but when I get tired of that I grab my trusty 270 and I go and harvest an animal or three. Having patience and knowing how to shoot your weapon of choice will make a person a better hunter than you will ever be.


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Yes. BAD advice indeed.

I’ve shot countless deer and have helped track buddy’s badly shot deer and there is no worse way to spend a cold, dark, evening than to help a cocky shooter find a suffering animal.



makes me rather ill . . . . .


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Agreed, better to drop them ethically to just shoot and hope for the best. And I'm in the same boat where I'm in the market for a rifle right now. The 6.5prc is in my top 3 right now.
 

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6.5 PRC is a great round, i have/had 2.
Reloading gets the best potential out if it, as factory loads are somewhat lame - i mean i can load my creed with same bullet to a faster velocity than factory 140-143gr PRC rounds using a lot less powder.
However, 147-150-153-156 gr bullets, the PRC shines. Or hotrodding lighter bullets - i am shooting hand loaded 125 gr mono high BC bullets at 3200 fps, under an inch at 200yds, which will hopefully be a good match for longer open shots on deer. Sure tangs gongs at long distance! And for deep penetrating heavies, a previous post i made here was shooting 156 oryx bullets into a moose, 324 yds dropped in its tracks.

If shooting factory all around, youll get prob 10-20% better terminal ballistics from the prc vs creed
Just be prepared to grab your ankles when you buy ammo…. Makes practising a byotch when its close to 4-5$ per shot, vs $1-1.50 for reloading it.
 

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some men just cant handle a big gun, If you can why would you want shoot something small ? Makes no sense to me but I get it, I very rarely ever shoot past 50 yards cause I'm not a guy that sits in a tree. I stalk hunt, so many times in the thick nasty bush where I hunt to get a good placed kill shot there's a pile of willows in the way or a big poplar, with my bigger calibers that I prefer I have to second guess the shot. I can take it and then walk over to gut my deer or moose.
 

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Now THAT’S a hunter. No bragging rights on long range kills. Just the stalk to close range that most of us are afraid to try LOL.


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Whatever you decide, get a Lead Sled for when you are sighting in your rifle. This will reduce the recoil if you are having issues getting it sighted in for whatever reason.
I had an old 30.06 that had a lousy scope... I banged out quite a few rounds and got to the point where I dreaded every single shot with that old steel-plated butt stock. I got the lead sled, took the human more out of the equation, and then realized the scope was pooched.

Rifle season is almost here now.... good luck!


For the record, I now have a newer 308 with a decent recoil pad on it. I still use the lead sled for initial sighting in.
 
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